Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Learning the Story of Aboriginal Australians through Their Art






Since graduating from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a BA in accounting, Amin Andy Lakha has established a successful career, including as the CEO of Lakha Investments, spanning approximately three decades. Beyond his strictly professional pursuits, Amin Andy Lakha has actively supported the Seattle Art Museum (SAM).

Since its establishment in 1933, SAM’s collections have grown exponentially, from less than 2,000 pieces at its opening to over 25,000 in 2008. Notable for its collections of modern and ethnic art, it houses a significant number of pieces of Aboriginal Australian art.

With a history that can be traced back 30,000 years, Aboriginal Australian art is considered to be the oldest ongoing tradition of art in the world. Although the earliest forms of Aboriginal Australian artistic expression were rock carvings, indigenous artists eventually explored other forms and media, including canvas, fiber, and glass. The diversity of Aboriginal Australian art reflects the richness of the continent’s indigenous culture and serves as a way of connecting with others, despite linguistic, topographical, or tribal differences. This art has also been an effective avenue for the indigenous people of Australia to tell their story, especially amid their struggle for survival.

To learn more about Aboriginal Australian art, visit SAM. To plan your trip, visit SeattleArtMuseum.org.

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